Kayak Fishing Ultimate Resource

Wednesday, 10 November 2010 18:34

Over Before You Know It

November 1st marked the opening day of the Winter Sturgeon season on the popular Lower Willamette.  Retention days were set at Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays.  Having been closed since March, many people were eager for the season to begin again.  And so it did.

And then it was gone.

Published in Pacific Northwest
Thursday, 04 March 2010 12:15

Things are picking up

Slowly but surely the Spring Chinook season is picking up.  This is the first week in several that I've not been able to get on the water, and I'm dieing to be in the mix now.

Until monday, most anglers have been targetting the Willamette River because permanant regulations allow for salmon fishing 7 days a week.  Angler efforts have picked up daily.  One day I was out in my kayak trolling along with 8 other boats, the next day it was 12 other boats.  A week later I saw 24 boats.  Some trolling, some on the hook.

Published in Pacific Northwest

The Columbia River Compact (comprised of representatives from Oregon and Washington Fish and Wildlife offices, tribes, etc) met today to nail down the 2010 seasons for Spring Chinook (springer) and white sturgeon on the Columbia River.  Many recreational, tribal, and commercial interests were present, as well as myself.  The States started with the proposed guidelines based on catch and population statistics.  Testimony was heard from all the interest groups.  And, finally, a decision was made.

Published in Pacific Northwest
Tuesday, 02 February 2010 13:24

First Confirmed Springer Boated!

The first confirmed Spring Run Chinook Salmon (Springer) was caught yesterday, February 1st.  While with guide Larry Kesch Jr, of Hook'em Up Guide Service, angler Jesse Eveland picked up this beauty while trolling the NW standardard plug cut herring.

I also got a report of a second springer caught, but still have not seen any photos to go along with it.  That second springer was said to be caught on a back bounced kwikfish.  That'd be two springers caught on the two most common methods.

 

Published in Pacific Northwest
Sunday, 27 December 2009 11:58

2010 Not looking good for Sturgeon Anglers

2010 isn't looking so good for sport and commercial sturgeon fishing in the lower Columbia River. We won't know for sure until Feb 18th when Oregon and Washing fish and wildlife commissions publish their finalized regulations for sturgeon and salmon.

But last week, Bill Tweit, Columbia River policy lead for Washington, did not want any actions taken for January or February that would preclude cuts in sturgeon harvest as deep as 50 percent.

Published in Pacific Northwest
Sunday, 13 December 2009 11:30

Bbrrr - Bring on the Spring(er) Thaw!

Fishing the last few weeks has been tough, if not impossible.  The Tillamook River is iced over and others are getting a bit hard as well.  Earlier rains washed out rivers makeing them undriftable.  When the rains subsided, the winds picked up.  Then after the winds, the waters were glass clear - too clear for Chinook.  Then the subfreezing temps arrived.  Ouch!

The most interesting bit of news came Friday.  State, Federal and Tribal committees from Oregon and Washington announced their predictions for the 2010 Spring Chinook returns. I'm still skeptical, but they're expecting about 470,000 adult Springers to run the Columbia in a few months.  This newest prediction is the largest return of Springers since 1938 - when the Bonneville Dam was built and fish counting began. In 2009, they forecasted 350,000, but we only saw half that.  In 2001, we did get over 400,000 fish, so it’s possible that this next year could be good.

 

 

Even still, if we get half of the current prediction, we're looking at some good fishing!  Its hard to speculate what Spring Chinook regulations will be (announced Feb. 18, 2010) but I’d expect an angler take of about 20,000 adults. Last year we brought in almost 17,000. Fishing for Springers on the Columbia, and we will likely be limited to just 3-days out of the week just like last year.

Scientists base predictions based on the number of young "Jack" salmon that return with the adults.  In 2009, we had a HUGE number of these teenaged Jack salmon in the rivers, instead of the ocean.  The 80,000+ jacks counted this year were four times more than were counted in 2000, which lead to the huge numbers in 2001.  Because of over grossly over-estimated predictions since 2001, scientists have altered their formulas.  The most popular results this marked a return range between 330,000 and 580,000, so committees and scientists settled on a number right in between.

 

 

 

 

 

Now, these are the numbers for the Columbia River at Bonneville Dam.  Coming this week we’ll have numbers for the Willamette River through Portland.  This figure rarely follow the Columbia numbers, but they are very often much more accurate.  Biologists in Oregon are thinking 60,000 fish for the Willamette are likely, which would be enough to keep the river open to Chinook fishing 7-days a week, with a two fish limit! Yum!

 

 

Published in Pacific Northwest

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