Kayak Fishing Ultimate Resource

  • Thoughts on the Torpedo Bait Bucket

    When I first saw pictures of the Torpedo Bait Bucket I was intrigued. It was a newer, lighter version of what I had seen people make from PVC pipe for year. I fish live bait on the coast some and with my kids in freshwater so I thought I’d give it a try. Read More
  • First Hobie Fishing Worlds V Qualifying Event Announced

    Ohio valley kayak anglers looking to participate in next year’s Hobie Fishing Worlds V rejoice! Hobie announces their return to Kentucky Dam Village State Park May 29-31 2015. This is the first qualifying event announced for the 2015 Hobie Fishing Worlds tournament. The winner of this event will receive automatic entry and airfare to compete as a member of Team USA. See below press release for full details. Read More
  • Floating Jigs for Metalheads

    A number of years ago, there was a revolution in steelhead fishing: the simple marabou jig. Suspended in the water by a float, jigging steelhead is a surefire way to get into the fish. Fishermen started leaving their rolls of lead and bait behind because simple jigs were picking up fish. Bad fishermen were catching steelhead with jigs. Good fishermen were catching a ton of steelhead on jigs. Read More
  • Selling Out For $20 and a T-Shirt

    The kayak angling industry is growing rapidly. Some figures suggest as many as 25% more kayaks are sold year over year for the last five years. With the fast expanse comes a bevy of new companies selling their products in new venues and reaching new markets, specifically kayak anglers.  Read More
  • Seein' Red in December

    As the year draws to a close, I’m just trying to find time to get out to the marshes in this busy season. Between holidays, birthdays, parties, and work, finding time to fish has been almost impossible at times. In fact, the last time I had targeted redfish was before Halloween. Read More
  • Winter Salmon Fishing in Alaska

    I moved to Kenai, AK in 1971 when I was five years old. My father was an avid fisherman, and he in turn got me addicted. Since that time, like clockwork, we would switch from open water fishing to ice fishing in November. I had heard about the winter king salmon fishery in Homer, but wrote it off to a futile attempt by crazed daredevils to shake the winter blues. Then I got a kayak, and my life… errr, fishing schedule (same thing) changed. Read More
  • Kayak Fishing With Freezing Fingers

    Some people put their kayaks away when the starts to mercury drop and winter arrives. However, there is still some good fishing to be found if you can get on the water. You need to wear the proper clothing and safety gear, but even if you have a great dry suit your hands still can get wet and cold. Here are some options for keeping your hands warm while still being able to perform necessary functions. Read More
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
Sat, Dec 20, 2014

Recent Reviews

Malibu "Mini X"
 
3.4
Reviewed by Mark Watanabe
"I was lucky enough to borrow a Malibu Mini X for over a year from the owner of Kayak Fishing Radio Chip Gibson. Used in specific situations the Mini X excels, but I wouldn't recommend it if you fish large bodies of water frequently. The Malibu Mini X has many great features but is by no means a good “all around kayak”. Let’s start with what I like about the Malibu Mini X Light weight – The Malibu..."
Tackle Shack
 
4.0
Reviewed by Mark Watanabe
"Finding our selves without kayaks at 7 pm Friday night, we were in a scramble. Adam and I needed to get our hands on some form of roto-molded flotation device to use on our last fishing day in Florida. We stopped by a small kayak shop in Largo but they didn't have any rentals left. Three calls to other shops “without naming names” ended in “Sorry but we can’t help you”. Our final stop was a..."
Ohero “Carbonado”
 
4.5
Reviewed by Greg Becker
"As much as I love 7’6”and 8’ spinning rods for flats fishing from my kayak, I’ve experienced two issues. The rod butts tend to get in the way when casting from a low seated position, and the leverage of the longer rod takes its toll on muscles and joints after hours of casting and “walking the dog” with a topwater plug. Enter Ohero Fishing’s new 7’ “Carbonado” series rods, specifically designed for kayak fishing. When I first spoke with..."
Malibu "Ranger 15"

Malibu "Ranger 15" Hot

http://www.yakangler.com/media/reviews/photos/thumbnail/315x315s/be/82/1c/ranger-51-1368470993.jpg
May 22, 2012    
 
0.0
 
3.0 (1)
5838   0   4   0   0
Write Review
Malibu Ranger

Kayak Make & Model

Brand:
Malibu
Model:
Ranger
MSRP ($):
1,299.00
Length (ft):
15.5

The “Ranger 15” is Malibu’s foray into the canoe/kayak hybrid frontier. With a large open deck perfect for fly fishermen, the Ranger 15 give kayak fishermen plenty of options. The Explorer seat and adjustable foot track system provide all-day comfort, and the Ranger has ample bungee-secured storage fore and aft.

Features:
  • Spider Angler Seat set
  • Arm rest pads
  • Adjustable foot track system
  • Bow & stern handles
  • 2 rear rod holders

Specs:

  • Width: 32"
  • Weight: 80 lbs
  • Height: 15"
  • Capacity: 600 lbs

Photos

ranger side shot
Ranger Paddling
Ranger Poling

User reviews

Average user rating from: 1 user(s)

Overall rating 
 
3.0
Speed 
 
3.0  (1)
Stability 
 
4.0  (1)
Durability 
 
4.0  (1)
Features 
 
2.0  (1)
Value 
 
2.0  (1)
Already have an account? or Create an account
I received the Ranger 15 just last week, and it was with great anticipation. I was intrigued with the first glimpses of the kayak and wondered how it would handle. Coming in a single seat (15.1) and tandem models (15.2), the Ranger 15 is Malibu's entry into the hybrid kayak market.

With the high free board and width, The Ranger 15 takes a wider and higher stroke from the seated position compared to my other Malibu kayaks. It’s a bit wetter from paddle drip and the higher angle of attack with the paddle. While it tracked well into all different wind directions, I think a rudder would help. I found it equal to my Stealth 14 for speed.

I found it very easy to stand up from the seated position, and the stability was good. With a tunnel hull your feet are stuck in one position, which I didn’t like. I’m more used to my Stealth 14, so I guess it would take some getting used to. When standing, the bow is pushed down and the stern is forced up a little out of the water. This causes the kayak to “weathervane” into the wind, making it a handful to keep on a straight course. I found that deploying my anchor (in the folded up position) would help keep the stern from swinging around into the wind.

The seat attaches to a plastic seat tray, which in turn is connect to adjustable side rails. This tray is bolted into position and requires the proper wrench to make adjustments on the fly. In front of the seat is a support bar, which at first glance you would think would be in the way. This was not the case. In fact, the bar helps with standing, and also gives you a place to rest a fishing rod At first I thought this bar should be located behind the seat, and a smaller one located up front towards the bow. This still might be a good idea, giving the hull more stability.

The area behind the seat is rather large, but plenty big for a milk crate or cooler. The problem is, there is no way to secure anything in place. The area that serves as a rear tank well area is to far aft in the single version, but is reachable in the tandem configuration.

With no paddle holders installed, I had to stow my paddle and push pole down inside the kayak. The side pads are installed a bit too far aft, but would be good if the seat was moved back a few inches.
Overall rating 
 
3.0
Speed 
 
3.0
Stability 
 
4.0
Durability 
 
4.0
Features 
 
2.0
Value 
 
2.0
Bill Howard Reviewed by Bill Howard May 13, 2013
Last updated: May 13, 2013
Top 10 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (18)

Malibu Ranger 15 Review

I received the Ranger 15 just last week, and it was with great anticipation. I was intrigued with the first glimpses of the kayak and wondered how it would handle. Coming in a single seat (15.1) and tandem models (15.2), the Ranger 15 is Malibu's entry into the hybrid kayak market.

With the high free board and width, The Ranger 15 takes a wider and higher stroke from the seated position compared to my other Malibu kayaks. It’s a bit wetter from paddle drip and the higher angle of attack with the paddle. While it tracked well into all different wind directions, I think a rudder would help. I found it equal to my Stealth 14 for speed.

I found it very easy to stand up from the seated position, and the stability was good. With a tunnel hull your feet are stuck in one position, which I didn’t like. I’m more used to my Stealth 14, so I guess it would take some getting used to. When standing, the bow is pushed down and the stern is forced up a little out of the water. This causes the kayak to “weathervane” into the wind, making it a handful to keep on a straight course. I found that deploying my anchor (in the folded up position) would help keep the stern from swinging around into the wind.

The seat attaches to a plastic seat tray, which in turn is connect to adjustable side rails. This tray is bolted into position and requires the proper wrench to make adjustments on the fly. In front of the seat is a support bar, which at first glance you would think would be in the way. This was not the case. In fact, the bar helps with standing, and also gives you a place to rest a fishing rod At first I thought this bar should be located behind the seat, and a smaller one located up front towards the bow. This still might be a good idea, giving the hull more stability.

The area behind the seat is rather large, but plenty big for a milk crate or cooler. The problem is, there is no way to secure anything in place. The area that serves as a rear tank well area is to far aft in the single version, but is reachable in the tandem configuration.

With no paddle holders installed, I had to stow my paddle and push pole down inside the kayak. The side pads are installed a bit too far aft, but would be good if the seat was moved back a few inches.

Ranger Paddling
Ranger Poling
ranger side shot
Was this review helpful to you? 
 
Powered by JReviews