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Sun, Dec 11, 2016
Backwater "Assault" Hand Paddle

Backwater "Assault" Hand Paddle Hot

 
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Backwater Assault Hand Paddle

Paddle Make & Model

Brand:
Backwater Paddles
Model:
Assault
MSRP ($):
29.99

The "Assault" Hand Paddle from Backwater Paddle Company is going to make kayak fishing a whole lot easier. It's the perfect paddle when you need to move just a few feet or adjust the position your boat while holding still holding on to your rod. The Assault paddle is a must-have for fishing in windy conditions to keep your boat facing the right direction. It's lightweight and has a slim profile so it's easy to tuck next to your seat or at your feet to keep it handy. The hook is useful for grabbing on to the dock to pull yourself in or for retrieving your line. You can use the serrated edge of the paddle to push off shore or any tree roots you find yourself up against. This handy paddle has a UV protective coating, a wrist leash, and it floats! You can also keep it in a hatch to use as an emergency paddle. This is a well-designed paddle that you'll end up reaching for over and over again.

 

 

Features:

  • Slim profile and lightweight design
  • Use the serrated edge to push off
  • Made of strong, fade resistant plastic
  • Use the hook to grab on to the dock or retrieve your line

Specs:

  • Lengths Available: 22 in / 56 cm
  • Weight: 12 oz

 

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User reviews

5 reviews

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4.8  (5)
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Ratings (the higher the better)
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User Info
Pros & Cons
Comments
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5.0

Backwater "Assault" Hand Paddle

I originally got this paddle for use in my canoe when fishing and it came in very handy for small adjustments especially when holding a rod or needing one hand free. When I got my kayak the same held true for it as well. The hooked notch works fantastic grabbing and holding on to branches, docks, and anything else. The ridged edge is great for pushing off. It is definitely stiff enough to remain durable for this use even thought it has seen its share of concrete ramps and rock beds. It does its job for single hand adjustments as well. It is small enough to stash in many areas out of the way but still be within reach and if it ever does fall in it floats so you won't lose it.

User Info

Waters Fished:
  • Small Creeks
  • Large Lakes
  • Small Ponds
Used:
7-15 times

Pros & Cons

Pros:
Light, Floats, Durable, Multi-use, Single Hand Use
Cons:
None
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4.0

Durable, floating paddle

Check out my full video review here: https://youtu.be/3znGbbCabmA

One of the aspects about kayak fishing that many of us love is that we can get to places other boaters can’t. We can fish the deeper backwaters that most boaters can only dream of. But when we find ourselves in the thick of it we also notice that we don’t have nearly as much room to paddle and use our full length paddle is limited. This is when you want to use the smaller, single bladed paddle. This is when you break out the Backwater Assault Paddle.

The Assault Paddle is made from Polypropylene Plastic, has UV Protection, is 22” long by 6” wide, comes in at 12 ounces, and best of all, it floats! The design is pretty sick looking with a fish skeleton in the blade and has a large hook on one end and teeth on the other. The hook is perfect for grabbing onto branches or grass and moving your kayak. The teeth help provide traction when you pushing off a wet log or anything that is slippery. Backwater also provides a 100% Guarantee. So that if it breaks because of anything, they will replace it. It comes in a dark green or bright orange color. The paddle is lightweight, strong, and willing to take a beating from anything you can offer.

I took the Assault Paddle with me on multiple adventures, some in my Jackson Cuda, NuCanoe Pursuit, and in the Hobie Outback. The paddle was easily stored underneath the seat or next to the crate and didn’t get in the way. When I was in my paddle kayaks I didn’t find a real need for the paddle. Mainly because I generally keep my full length paddle on my lap so it is easily accessible. Plus whether I was paddling in a lake or a creek my regular paddle did the trick. The Assault Paddle was handy when going through some heavily wooded areas in the back area of a creek. I was able to use the hook and grab onto branches to help push myself forward, but honestly, I couldn’t just used my hands. Perhaps if I had my regular paddle strapped down on the side of the kayak then the Assault Paddle would’ve been more effective. The story changes drastically when I fished out of the Hobie. When fishing in a lake or a place with deeper water I used the Assault Paddle to help launch me away from shore, turn quickly and make any adjustments quickly and easily. It was perfect for getting away from docks, piers, or to go reverse in the Hobie. The only time I used a full paddle in the Hobie was when the water was too shallow to flutter the drive for a medium to long distance.

The Backwater Assault Paddle costs just shy of $30. It is lightweight, strong, floats, and can take a beating. Is it a Catch or a Release? In my opinion, if you are in a paddle kayak then the Assault Paddle is a Release. Why, because it just ends up being another piece of equipment that you don’t use that often. Your main paddle will do the trick. However, if you are in a pedal kayak the Backwater Assault Paddle is a definite CATCH. It will become an invaluable tool for you on your kayak!

User Info

Waters Fished:
  • Large Rivers
  • Small Creeks
  • Large Lakes
  • Small Ponds
  • Salwater Flats
Used:
16-30 times

Pros & Cons

Pros:
Lightweight, Floats, Durable
Cons:
Not overly useful in a paddle kayak
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5.0

Backwater "Assault" Hand Paddle

A couple years ago I received a couple of these paddles as part of a package that I won from an online derby. At that time they were made of wood. My first thoughts were, who could I give them away to, or it even crossed my mind to re-gift. They sat in my garage for over a year. I still don't know why or what gave me the idea to put them in the front hatch of my Hobie Pro Angler. There it sat for a couple months until one day I went to grab my Hobie paddle which was strapped down with bungee cords at the back of the kayak. It was at that moment I thought why not use the wooden paddle I had in the hatch. Quickly I pulled it from the front of the kayak and proceeded to re-adjust my position where I was fishing with only a few paddle strokes. From there I laid the paddle down on the floor next to the Hobie Mirage well, where it was out of the way and within a quick grasp for any repositioning I needed to do. That was just over a year ago and I now keep a paddle in both of my Pro Anglers and since that time I have not used my Hobie paddle even once. The Backwater Assault Paddle has been used to pull out snags, push off of shore, reach for someone in another kayak, used it as a fish club when harvesting table fare (walleye and steelhead), and I now consider it my most used accessory in the kayak.

For Hobie Pro Angler owners this is an exceptional aid for steering when in rivers. If you are floating a narrow river with some obstacles that you have to maneuver around, the paddle gives you a little extra control to aid in steering, and also serves as a tool to push off of anything that may get in your way.

When You are fishing a dock or a bank a quick couple paddle strokes gives you the reverse that apparently seems to be an issue if you read a competitors marketing adds.

I can also see this paddle being just as resourceful in a paddle kayak where it would be much easier to grab and make a few strokes to re-adjust, rather than pick up a full length paddle. Where a lot of guys keep their paddle across their lap while fishing, they could now bungee their paddle to the side and use the Assault Paddle for any moves they need to make.

I now have enough Backwater Assault Paddles for each of my four kayaks as I don't want to leave home without one.

User Info

Waters Fished:
  • Large Rivers
  • Small Creeks
  • Large Lakes
Used:
30+ times

Pros & Cons

Pros:
versatility, compact, durable,
Cons:
none
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5.0

Assault Hand Paddle from Backwater Paddle

If you’re like me, when I first started seeing the Assault Hand Paddle by Backwater Paddle Company on social media I could not for the life of me understand what importance or usefulness this thing could have. There were some well-known people in the kayak fishing community who were promoting them but I chalked it up to good marketing at best. I figured I did not need another paddle other than the one that I use to get from one place to the other. What could I do with the Assault Paddle that I couldn’t already do with the paddle that I have?

Let me share with you when my thoughts began to change about this paddle’s usefulness. As many of you know, I spend a lot of time sight fishing in very skinny water. Stealth is a very important factor in this manner of fishing. While on the water, I found myself in constant circumstances when I needed to move my kayak a short distance or just reposition it. I noticed that when I would retrieve my paddle or set it back down on the kayak, there was a propensity to make unwanted noise. Even if I was successful at maintaining stealth mode, it required a great deal of effort. And when I wasn’t successful, well it usually ended up with some fleeing reds that I had worked so hard to stalk. It was during these situations that I began to reconsider my initial negative impression of the Assault Hand Paddle. It was during these situations that I wished I had such a valuable tool.

After some consideration, I decided to get one and I figured that even if I didn’t use it, I would only be out about thirty bucks. Luckily, I was able to pick one up locally at Ship To Shore Co. Now, let me just say I have used the Assault Paddle for almost a month. I usually like to wait longer before writing a review but I have used this paddle so much (more than what I thought I would) and it has served its purpose extremely well, I figured there was no need to wait longer. This paddle allows me to move my kayak short distances, reposition it to set up for that perfect cast, or to paddle with one hand while holding my rod to retrieve a snagged lure. More importantly, it allows me to do all these things without making noise because it is small and I can keep it within arms reach. I can quietly retrieve it and move around with very little effort. And this means a better chance of getting on those reds feeding in skinny water!

Certainly there are more benefits and uses for this paddle but for the sake of brevity I will leave it at this, as this is the main reason I wanted one. I have no doubt about the products quality. Just holding it in my hand was enough to see that the Assault Paddle is very durable and could take a beating. Oh, if you are wondering if it floats… it does. I say this not because I read it but because I know from personal experience. I accidentally knocked it out of my kayak when I grabbed my net to land a nice red and when I turned around there it was floating!

The Assault Paddle is definitely a very useful tool and is well worth the small price tag. So, what can I do with it that I can’t do with my regular kayak paddle? Well, I can do the same things but I can do them with more ease and with STEALTH!

User Info

Waters Fished:
  • Salwater Flats
  • Saltwater Bays
Used:
16-30 times

Pros & Cons

Pros:
Durable, Stealth, Inexpensive
Cons:
None
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5.0

Backwater Assault Hand Paddle

I recently purchased a Backwater Assault Hand Paddle and I have to tell you this is the most useful kayak accessory I have ever had. I use it to steer my yak in place of a rudder, grab onto stick-ups or branches and pull my yak into tight spots I want to fish, I use it to push off from shore and/or docks, and most recently have had a friend teach me that it works great as a tire anchor for anchoring to breakwaters made of tires.

User Info

Waters Fished:
  • Large Rivers
  • Small Creeks
  • Large Lakes
  • Small Ponds
Used:
7-15 times

Pros & Cons

Pros:
Small and lightweight, easy to stash anywhere on the yak
Cons:
None found as yet.
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