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Springtime Fishing in the Lowcountry

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Springtime is when I start thinking about Easter egg hunts, baby chicks, ducklings, and bunnies. When it comes to the springtime season and inshore fishing around the Lowcountry, I realize the clear water we enjoy during the winter is going to start looking like chocolate milk. The clarity of the inshore waters will vary from river to river. As weather and water conditions change, so do the fish species that I’ll target from my kayak.

The speckled trout will start moving from their offshore areas back into the flats. One of these areas is Cape Romain, concentrating on Anderson Creek, Fenning Creek, Graham Creek, Harbor River, and Five Fathom Creek. Speckled trout will be following the bait into the shallows. The sow trout are ready to start to spawn and are getting hungry. Early morning or late afternoon topwater is your best bet for a gator-size trout in the Lowcountry, since the water temperature will be around 60°F.

Springtime also means that the redfish will start breaking up into smaller schools. Unlike their cousin the speckled trout, redfish don’t spawn till July through September, for about a six or seven week period. During the spring, your best bet to catch quality redfish in the Lowcountry is to concentrate on the Wando River. The Wando is the clearest and holds the most saltwater when compared to the Cooper and Ashley Rivers near Charleston. Another plus for the Wando is that the river has more oyster beds and more mud flats then the other two rivers that flow into the Charleston Harbor.

In the Murrells Inlet area, the flounder bite starts to pick up as they start coming into the inshore creeks from deep water. You best bet is to drift with the current in 6’ – 10’ of water -keeping in mind that the fish will be facing into the current - with mud minnows, live finger mullet, or with a paddle tail plastic, keeping the presentation as close to the bottom as possible. If you start near the jetties and work your way inland, you will also have opportunities for redfish and trout. This is a prime area to add an outstanding inshore slam to your personal list of accomplishments.

Cobia will start to move into the Broad River to spawn. This brings the anglers to start anchoring up at the Robert Smalls Parkway Bridge that crosses the Broad River. This is a popular place because there are concentrated numbers of cobia and a great opportunity to catch giant females. The Broad River has a swift current on the outgoing tide and is an area limited to experienced kayak anglers, in my opinion. This warning comes from several kayak anglers with more experience than I have. After all, you will be anchoring the kayak along with forty or so power boats in the area.

These are just some suggestions for angling in the springtime Lowcountry for saltwater species. There are hundreds of spots, but in my opinion these places will provide you the opportunity to catch the trophies that you dream about here in the Lowcountry.

Read 3834 times Last modified on Tuesday, 01 April 2014 11:09
Darrell Olson

Darrell Olson an avid Fisherman enjoys bait fishing, using a spinning rod, bait caster, fly fishing, and fishing challenges that come his way. While living in England he was recognized as the 1981 Master Angler from the Rod & Gun Clubs of Europe. He has been kayak angling for a little more than five years. He is one of the founders of the South Carolina Kayak Fishing Association’s monthly Meet and Fish events. He is currently the Secretary/Treasurer of the Lowcountry Kayak Anglers. For the past three years he has been participating in the Inshore Fishing Association (IFA) Kayak Tour for the Atlantic Division. Darrell is a member of the Jackson Regional Kayak Fishing Team, an Ambassador for Power-Pole and Raymarine. Darrell is also a member of the YakAngler Pro Staff and the YakAngler Will It Fish video series.

 

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