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Putting in the Time

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Putting in the Time Photograph by Rob Choi

For some time now, I've been trying to join the small group of kayakers who can say they've caught a citation tautog. They have to be either 9lbs killed or 23" released. Some people just happen to be at the right place at the right time, having only caught a few togs in his/her life, and amazingly find their prize. Others have caught countless togs, coming up just short of the magic 23" mark before their fateful day of holding their well deserved trophy. I've put more hours into this pursuit than I care to admit, and I would love to say this story is about the one, but it's not. Apparently, the fishing gods think I need to put in more time.

 

Hoping the gods would be swayed by my recent birthday to grant me luck, I ventured out to the first island of the CBBT in search of the elusive togzilla. The paddle out was calm and I reached the ever promising, familiar, and favorite tog holding structures in record time. With clam and blue crab as bait, I felt sure I was going to find a good bite. And I did. But unfortunately, like a slap in the face from the gods, they were all the size of my hand. Frustration set in as hours went by without anything over 11". It was then that I remembered my last weeks blog entry. I needed to relax, smell the salt air that I love, enjoy the lack of wind, smile, and try another spot. Eventually, I hooked into a nice fat 17.5" female.

LargeFemaletog

Even though my parents (who were watching my daughter) hoped I would bring back some delicious tautog, I released her. And as I watched her swim away I wished her the best in finding Mr. Big Tog to do her spring thing, get her groove on, you know... bump uglies and make lots of wee little togs. And in the back of my mind, I hoped the act would put me in good standing with the fishing gods for them to favor me, if not on this trip, hopefully on the next one.... or at least bring me some good fishing karma.

Soon after, the wind started picking up and it was time to head back. About three-quarters of the way back, it started getting pretty bad. NOAA said it would, and this time, they were right. I got back to shore with jello arms, wishing my yak and gear would pack themselves. I looked back at the water, nodded and resigned myself to the fact that I needed to put in more time for that trophy. One day, perhaps in the summer or fall, because for now, I believe it's time to shift gears and bust out the big stuff. Catches of a few bull reds at the Eastern Shore have been confirmed.



About the Author: Rob Choi is an avid kayak angler from the Chesapeake Bay area in Virginia and a Pro Staff Member at Yakangler.com. He has earned a reputation among the locals as the fish junkie with reckless abandon to logic, time, and societal norms in his pursuit for the "tug that is the drug".  He shares his love of the sport through his blog www.angling-addict.com.

Read 1814 times Last modified on Wednesday, 07 September 2011 08:02
Rob Choi

About the Author: Rob Choi is an avid kayak angler from Richmond, VA and although he lives close to the mighty James River, he frequents the Chesapeake Bay more often. His addiction to the salt has earned him a reputation among the locals as the fish junkie with reckless abandon to logic, time, and societal norms in his pursuit for the “tug that is the drug”. What he lacks in long term experience, he makes up in his passionate dedication to the sport now. He shares his love of the sport through his blog, www.angling-addict.com, as well as being a prostaff member at Ocean Kayak, Maui Jim Sunglasses, YakAngler.com, YakAttack, Werner Paddles, and crew member of HOOK 1 and Kayak Bass Fishing.

www.angling-addict.com
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