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TOPIC: Reaching things behind you?

Reaching things behind you? 4 weeks 2 days ago #1


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Am I the only one that finds it somewhat difficult to reach items that are stored behind me? I have a stable SOT yak, I'm in fairly decent physical shape, and have been kayak fishing for several years in all types of water from freshwater lakes & streams to inshore & offshore saltwater. Yet, sometimes I still have trouble maintaining my balance & getting to things behind me in my yak. Most of the time I just turn sideways & let my feet hang in the water to gt into my cooler. That works great but, sometimes I'm in a hurry & just have to reach back for something like a rod, net, gaff, etc. I have 4 flush rod holder that hold my rods, net, & gaff if I take it. I don't use a crate, & have an igloo marine cooler that sits behind me where a crate would normally be. I keep drinks & snacks in it & use it to store fish and bait. My bow is open, Pescador Pro, so that's usually where I keep my tackle & other items. I can reach it just fine by reaching forward or scooting up. If I'm going offshore, I only bring a small box & usually keep it under the seat in the little cutout that's made for it. But, I see people all the time with setups that look like they would be horrible to access things from, especially if you were in a hurry, like rod holders on the back part of milk crates, camera poles, coolers in the area behind milk crates, etc. And, I don't know how the guys with live bait tanks behind them do it! I use a trolling bucket for live bait. Anyway, anyone else have this issue & how do you go about it?
Last Edit: 4 weeks 2 days ago by Yakcraz.
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Reaching things behind you? 4 weeks 2 days ago #2


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Do you actually put yourself in danger of flipping when you reach behind you or do you just "feel" like you are in danger. Have you ever taken it out to a swimming area and actually flipped it on purpose? Sounds like it might be a confidence issue. You might get a lot of benefit from taking your kayak to a swimming area and move around on it trying to push the limits. Try to see how much you can move around before it flips. If you don't end up in the water several times, you ain't pushing it far enough. Then, when you do flip, practice recovery. But the idea is to prove to yourself how far you can move around in the kayak before losing it. This should be a scheduled non-fishing swim/play day. Don't take any gear other than your pfd. Just you, the kayak and the water.
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Reaching things behind you? 4 weeks 1 day ago #3


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Keep your head centered over the kayak when twisting around. That will help keep your weight centered.

I have a sit-in (definitely not stable enough to stand up in) and it has enough room behind the seat that I keep my soft-tacklebox there. (Since the image below I have switched to a 5-box Plano). When switching lures I usually pull the just the one tray I need out of that up on my lap.



If I am carrying my Igloo Cube that fits behind the milk crate I do have to beach to get into that
Charlie P.

Perception Sport Sound 12.5

Last Edit: 4 weeks 1 day ago by Stumpkiller.
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Reaching things behind you? 4 weeks 1 day ago #4


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Yakcraz , I understand where you're coming from . I just don't bend like I used to . I've only had mine out a half dozen times since new , but was wondering the same thing about access . The water was still a little bit too cold to be putting my feet in every time I needed something behind me . As you stated , especially if it's something like the net that you need in a hurry . Was even considering one of those floating things you see advertised for extra gear on a river float , but can see that getting in the way on a windy day on the lake or when fighting a fish .
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Reaching things behind you? 4 weeks 1 day ago #5


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I'm 68 and can reach rods on the back side of my crate fairly easily... just have to practice you reach around.
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Reaching things behind you? 4 weeks 1 day ago #6


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Spider1 wrote:
Do you actually put yourself in danger of flipping when you reach behind you or do you just "feel" like you are in danger. Have you ever taken it out to a swimming area and actually flipped it on purpose? Sounds like it might be a confidence issue. You might get a lot of benefit from taking your kayak to a swimming area and move around on it trying to push the limits. Try to see how much you can move around before it flips. If you don't end up in the water several times, you ain't pushing it far enough. Then, when you do flip, practice recovery. But the idea is to prove to yourself how far you can move around in the kayak before losing it. This should be a scheduled non-fishing swim/play day. Don't take any gear other than your pfd. Just you, the kayak and the water.

I have actually done this in my yak and several others that I've owned over the years. It's a good practice & you can learn a lot from it especially if you're going to be primarily bass fishing in lakes or fishing small calmer bodies of water. My fishing varies greatly however as we travel a lot. I fish my local lake, streams & rivers with both slow & faster flows, & inshore & offshore saltwater throughout the year. And, I will say that it doesn't really prepare you for a lot of situations that you can wind up in. For instance: getting to your net while fighting a smallmouth when the river is pushing you quickly toward the rapids, trying to get your gaff to land a kingfish offshore in the swells, getting your rods out of the holders quickly when that low hanging limb is right in the middle of the rapids just around the curve & you couldn't see it until you got there, trying to untangle that redfish that somehow got wrapped up in your anchor trolley clip thats at the back of the yak at the time, ect. When your fighting a fish, trying to paddle & keep your yak upright & on the right course, & trying to reach something behind you at the same time it's a lot different than just playing on calm flat water with no gear & not worrying about much except for getting wet.
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Reaching things behind you? 4 weeks 1 day ago #7


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well, yeah. I thought you were talking about reaching behind you for gear, not reaching around for life saving equipment while fighting man eating redfish in class 3 rapids with your anchor line fouled around a giant squid! LOL!!! I thought you said something about hanging your feet over the side to reach for something in your crate or a camera or gaf. Yeah, when things get crazy you gotta keep your head in the game. I found out just a little while ago that forgetting what your doing or where you are and getting complacent can put you in the water fast. But knowing your boat and it's limitations is a good start. Another one is knowing where gear is stored. I'm sure you got that figured out already. Very often I tend to reach behind me for gear without turning around or even looking. I know where it is, or at least should be, so I reach for it blind. When I gotta dig for something it's usually not a big hurry since the emergency stuff is right at hand and I don't have to look for it. If I'm digging for gear or lures or extra camera batteries, I make sure I get into a controllable situation before I take my mind off the water for a minute. Like I said, I did that once and ended up swimming.

:fishing:
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