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TOPIC: Recommendations

Recommendations 1 year 2 months ago #1


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Currently in Arkansas but planning to relocate to south Florida within the next year. Just getting started w/ kayak fishing. Interested in saltwater (under excellent conditions), intercostal, and freshwater fishing. Do I need a fleet of kayaks for specific waters?
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Recommendations 1 year 1 month ago #2


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Multiple Yaks are nice but not needed. I use my Pro Angler for everything and before that I did it all in my Cuda 12. In small back waters and rivers where we go over lots of obstacles I wish I had something smaller but it works just fine. Demo some and see what fits you best. :up:
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Recommendations 1 year 1 month ago #3


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You'll find that some kayaks are better suited for certain types of waters than others, but if you get a good, stable, quality kayak, it can be a jack of all trades. I just cringe whenever someone mentions getting a cheap, barely-kayak-by-definition unit from some big box store and says they are gonna take it out on surf and tidal waters. It's like, yeah, that thing MIGHT stay afloat on flat water, but throw some boat wake, waves, or current at it, and you could be putting your life on the line, literally.
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Recommendations 1 year 1 month ago #4


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I have a Cuda 12 & will say it works well for most all waters. Tracks good, paddles well in current but I wouldn't try white water in it. I take it to the coast & inlet fish a lot too. I have not tried the surf & not sure if I ever will, not saying it would not work but just not interested. I also have a cheap 8ft sit inside that i take to a small local creek. Often run into rock & brush jams so easy to drag around them.
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Recommendations 1 year 1 month ago #5


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I think the guys have given good advice. I have a tarpon 12. It is older, as am I. I haul it from Kentucky to the gulf for family vacations and have used it on rivers, in the gulf and tidal waters. The one thing I think I miss is seating. I really like the removable seats of newer yaks. They sit you higher, but these old bones get pretty sore sitting for long periods. I agree, stay away from big box store cheaper kayaks. They sounds like a good option for entry, but if you enjoy the kayak, you will end up upgrading. Two things. everyone starts out as a minimalist and ends up with more gear than they can manage and if buy right once, you will save money in the long run.
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Recommendations 1 year 1 month ago #6


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A Fleet no... generally there are one kayak solutions that will do it all. Kind of depends on your budget and transportation options.

Really depends on your desire, you may want to wait til you get here and figure out what you really want to do. A lot depends on where you are and what you will fish for. People that mainly go offshore have different needs than those who fish inshore and/or lakes.

Typically here most people have a SitOnTop style kayak, for fishing, especially if beach launching and foshing off the coast. Inshore, lakes and canals you can get away with a sit inside.

Then you will need to decide if you are a paddle'er, pedal'er, or a motorized kind of person.

There are good enough kayaks in the 12' range that can serve the purpose for years to come for around $600.00, or you can go all out with a large tandem pedal kayak for up to $6,000.00+.
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Recommendations 1 year 1 month ago #7


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If you want a versatile fishing kayak you probably should get a medium length (11-14’) sit on top. I wouldn’t buy one that’s not stable enough to stand on. Even if you expect to mostly sit while fishing, the stability is still a plus and it feels really good to stand up and stretch without heading to the shore. One of the most common reasons people replace their old kayaks is because of uncomfortable seats. Make sure you’re comfortable in it, and keep in mind that low seats become uncomfortable much more quickly than elevated seats, and cushioning a low seat won’t ever make it as comfortable as a good elevated seat. There are a lot of good kayaks on the market right now, and capable fishing paddle boards are starting to flood the market. Most of them are much lighter than normal kayaks, a giant advantage when transporting and especially cartopping.
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Recommendations 1 year 1 month ago #8


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Thanks for all the advice! Definitely looking for sit-on-top and like the comments re: stability, seat quality, and box-store models.

Not making any decisions until I complete relocation; I already have enough crap to haul without adding a kayak to the list.

I hear longer boats are faster. Are they actually "faster" or are they easier to paddle, resulting in speed based on maintained momentum?
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Recommendations 1 year 1 month ago #9


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It’s a good idea to wait until after you move to buy your kayak. There’s lots of dealers in Florida, and lot of used boats available too.

It’s hard to get a feel for a kayak’s paddling characteristics without trying it out yourself. Longer kayaks tend to be easier to paddle/faster but they’re usually heavier and harder to transport, and they generally cost more. Most people who try to fish everywhere from streams to saltwater tend to choose medium length and width kayaks to maximize their options. A short boat might suit a stream fisherman well, while a 16 footer might be ideal for someone who launches from a beach and paddles long distances. Most of us can’t afford to buy the perfect boat for each place they fish, and settle on one that doesn’t break the bank or limit their options too much.
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