Kayak Fishing Ultimate Resource

Mon, Sep 01, 2014
Native Watercraft "Slayer 12"

Native Watercraft "Slayer 12" Hot

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October 22, 2012    
 
4.0
 
3.8 (3)
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native watercraft slayer 12

Kayak Make & Model

Brand:
Native Watercraft
Model:
Slayer
MSRP ($):
1,179.00
Length (ft):
12

Like its bigger brother, the Native Watercraft “Slayer 12” was built to satisfy requests for a clean, stable fishing platform for kayak anglers. The Slayer 12 features Native’s First Class Seat, built-in tackle storage, rod stagers, solid cushioned handles and the tag along wheel. Native Watercraft packed all the features of the Slayer 14.5 into a smaller, lighter kayak perfectly designed for catching snook in the intercostal waterways and bass in your local pond.

Features:

  • Groove
  • High/Low First Class Seat
  • Electronics Console
  • Open Bow Hatch w/ Optional Hatch Cover and Scuppers
  • Quiet Stable Hull
  • Tag Along Wheel

Specs:

  • Width: 31" 79 cm
  • Weight: 70 lbs 32 kg
  • Depth @ Beam: 12" 30 cm
  • Capacity: 400 lbs 181 kg

 

Photos

Slayer 12 photo in USA Today
GoPro Release
Hooked up
Grabbing a bass in my Native Slayer 12
Standing with ease in the Native Watercarft Slayer 12
Paddling the slayer 12 in Virginia Beach Va
Slayer 12 bow shot

Editor review

While in Virginia Beach, VA for the Columbus Day Boondoggle, I got to meet Woody Callaway from Liquidlogic Kayaks. Strapped to the trailer of the Liquidlogic RV was their newest kayak: the Native Watercraft “Slayer”. I jokingly asked Woody when I would be fishing out of the Slayer, and without hesitation, he said, “Tomorrow!”.

Initial impressions: The Native Watercraft Slayer 12 is clean and uncluttered - everything had its purpose. The overall lines on the kayak are very sleek with everything recessed nicely.

Portability: The Slayer 12 is listed at 70 lbs., but felt lighter. This is probably due to all the handles being solid, allowing you to control the kayak much more easily. All Slayers come equipped with the “Tag Along Wheel”. I tested it at the launch with the kayak fully loaded with gear. The Tag Along Wheel made the move from the car to the launch a breeze. The solid bow handle positioned horizontally made controlling the kayak extremely easy. This was the first stand-out feature of the Slayer that sets it apart from other similar kayaks.

Performance: On the water, you quickly feel like you’re paddling a much skinner kayak. The Slayer handled well in both stand up paddling and standard sitting paddling. The raised seated position felt tippier than the lower seated position, but this is the case with all kayaks.

The second stand out feature was the High Low First Class Seat. Switching between the high and low seated positions was very simple. Native uses bungees to hold the seat in place, so a simple lift and scoot allowed me to move it between positions without having to undo straps or clips. I did initially have concerns over the seat only being secured this way, but Native did a great job of molding the seat pan area to allow a nice, snug fit. The seat never felt loose or unsecure in either position, and was extremely comfortable.

Another positive was an extremely shallow draft. There are several sandbars out at Lynnhaven Bay that were no deeper than 6 inches, and I was able to paddle across them without issue.

Standability: I have yet to stand in a 31” wide kayak that felt this stable. The deck is very flat; I always had a stable position for my feet. The deck is right at or slightly below the waterline, which gives the kayak extra stability. One issue with the deck being this low is with the scupper plugs removed, water does come in slightly. I also feel the Slayer would benefit from adding a strap towards the bow to help in standing from the lower position.

Fishability: The Slayer is equipped with recessed groove tracks on the stern, midship and bow. This made it very easy for me to quickly add a couple of Scotty mounts and my YakAttack “Panfish”. There is also a small console designed to store your battery, and also mount any electronics you like to a groove track. The model I used had the groove track mounted directly to the console but Woody told me that the new models with have the track recessed like all the others.

The foam padding around the cup holder, accessory tray, and rod tip rests is a nice touch. The rod tip rests fit my bait casters, but didn’t fit my spinning rods very well; the larger guides on the spinning rods didn’t allow the rods to rest properly.

While on the water, I didn’t even notice the Plano box storage on the side of the seats. This would have made changing out tackle much easier with my Plano boxes right next to me.

While anchored or staked out, the Slayer would benefit greatly from an anchor trolley. I also noticed the Tag Along Wheel knocking with the side to side movement of the kayak. I mentioned this to Woody, and he said that it was an easy fix. I also missed a paddle keeper, there are no paddle keepers installed by the factory so you will have to add them yourself.

The final stand-out feature is the Slayers stability. I was able to fish all day in the kayak, turn around and grab tackle out of my crate, and access my gear in the bow without issue. When we got back to the launch, several others tried out the Slayer. People who have never stood in a kayak easily stood and paddled the Slayer.

Summary: I believe the Native Watercraft Slayer 12 will be in the running for next year’s KACA’s as Kayak of the Year. It’s stable, tracks well, is quick and nimble for a wider kayak, is easily moved using the Tag Along Wheel, and has a seating system that allows you to move from high to low seating positions with ease. When I’m in the market for a new paddling kayak, I’m almost positive it will be a Slayer!
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Speed 
 
3.0
Stability 
 
4.0
Durability 
 
5.0
Features 
 
4.0
Value 
 
4.0
Mark Watanabe Reviewed by Mark Watanabe May 03, 2013
Last updated: September 09, 2013
Top 10 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (20)

Kayak Of The Year Contender!

While in Virginia Beach, VA for the Columbus Day Boondoggle, I got to meet Woody Callaway from Liquidlogic Kayaks. Strapped to the trailer of the Liquidlogic RV was their newest kayak: the Native Watercraft “Slayer”. I jokingly asked Woody when I would be fishing out of the Slayer, and without hesitation, he said, “Tomorrow!”.

Initial impressions: The Native Watercraft Slayer 12 is clean and uncluttered - everything had its purpose. The overall lines on the kayak are very sleek with everything recessed nicely.

Portability: The Slayer 12 is listed at 70 lbs., but felt lighter. This is probably due to all the handles being solid, allowing you to control the kayak much more easily. All Slayers come equipped with the “Tag Along Wheel”. I tested it at the launch with the kayak fully loaded with gear. The Tag Along Wheel made the move from the car to the launch a breeze. The solid bow handle positioned horizontally made controlling the kayak extremely easy. This was the first stand-out feature of the Slayer that sets it apart from other similar kayaks.

Performance: On the water, you quickly feel like you’re paddling a much skinner kayak. The Slayer handled well in both stand up paddling and standard sitting paddling. The raised seated position felt tippier than the lower seated position, but this is the case with all kayaks.

The second stand out feature was the High Low First Class Seat. Switching between the high and low seated positions was very simple. Native uses bungees to hold the seat in place, so a simple lift and scoot allowed me to move it between positions without having to undo straps or clips. I did initially have concerns over the seat only being secured this way, but Native did a great job of molding the seat pan area to allow a nice, snug fit. The seat never felt loose or unsecure in either position, and was extremely comfortable.

Another positive was an extremely shallow draft. There are several sandbars out at Lynnhaven Bay that were no deeper than 6 inches, and I was able to paddle across them without issue.

Standability: I have yet to stand in a 31” wide kayak that felt this stable. The deck is very flat; I always had a stable position for my feet. The deck is right at or slightly below the waterline, which gives the kayak extra stability. One issue with the deck being this low is with the scupper plugs removed, water does come in slightly. I also feel the Slayer would benefit from adding a strap towards the bow to help in standing from the lower position.

Fishability: The Slayer is equipped with recessed groove tracks on the stern, midship and bow. This made it very easy for me to quickly add a couple of Scotty mounts and my YakAttack “Panfish”. There is also a small console designed to store your battery, and also mount any electronics you like to a groove track. The model I used had the groove track mounted directly to the console but Woody told me that the new models with have the track recessed like all the others.

The foam padding around the cup holder, accessory tray, and rod tip rests is a nice touch. The rod tip rests fit my bait casters, but didn’t fit my spinning rods very well; the larger guides on the spinning rods didn’t allow the rods to rest properly.

While on the water, I didn’t even notice the Plano box storage on the side of the seats. This would have made changing out tackle much easier with my Plano boxes right next to me.

While anchored or staked out, the Slayer would benefit greatly from an anchor trolley. I also noticed the Tag Along Wheel knocking with the side to side movement of the kayak. I mentioned this to Woody, and he said that it was an easy fix. I also missed a paddle keeper, there are no paddle keepers installed by the factory so you will have to add them yourself.

The final stand-out feature is the Slayers stability. I was able to fish all day in the kayak, turn around and grab tackle out of my crate, and access my gear in the bow without issue. When we got back to the launch, several others tried out the Slayer. People who have never stood in a kayak easily stood and paddled the Slayer.

Summary: I believe the Native Watercraft Slayer 12 will be in the running for next year’s KACA’s as Kayak of the Year. It’s stable, tracks well, is quick and nimble for a wider kayak, is easily moved using the Tag Along Wheel, and has a seating system that allows you to move from high to low seating positions with ease. When I’m in the market for a new paddling kayak, I’m almost positive it will be a Slayer!

Pros & Cons

Pros:
Stable, Comfortable Hi/Lo Seat, Solid handles, Solid construstion, Open bow hatch.
Cons:
Front scuppers are loud without plugs in. Wheel tends to lean to one side when rolling. Tackle trays on side of seat get wet.
Slayer 12 photo in USA Today
GoPro Release
Hooked up
Grabbing a bass in my Native Slayer 12
Was this review helpful to you? 
 

User reviews

Average user rating from: 3 user(s)

Overall rating 
 
3.8
Speed 
 
3.0  (3)
Stability 
 
4.3  (3)
Durability 
 
4.3  (3)
Features 
 
3.7  (3)
Value 
 
3.7  (3)
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I've had this kayak for a while now, so I think it's time for a review.
I fish this kayak on the saltwater flats and bays of Corpus Christi, so my critiques come from that perspective. So working from front to back, here is my critical analysis of the boat.

Pros:
Gear tracks: They are everywhere and make it very easy to mount the multitude of accessories that are now gear track compatible.
Handles: Front handle is perpendicular to the long axis of the boat and rigid. Gives a nice solid grip of the boat.
Bow well: Great for dry storage with the bow hatch cover. This makes it water proof. The well has scupper holes as well, so it will drain if you don't use the cover. 4 tie down point.
Console: Great place to mount a fish finder (more gear tracks here). Also gives easy access to the inside of the boat.
Cockpit: Very open design here. Plenty of room to stand. Not a lot to get tangled on. More gear tracks.
Seat: High and low position and very comfortable. No more wet but.
Mid handles: Also rigid like the others.
Behind seat dry bucket: Has a rubber hatch and a removable bucket that gives access inside the boat.
Flush mount rod holders: Come with the angler package.
Rear well: More gear tracks here with 4 tie down point. Fits standard milk crate with room to spare. Should fit the rectangle size as well, but haven't tried it.
Rear handle: Again a rigid one here, but this has more cons I will discuss below.
Rudder: Doesn't come with one, but rigged for it.
Tag along wheel: Makes portage easier and no need to carry a cart.

Cons:
Cockpit: Next to the seat are two slots for 3600 series plano boxes with a bungee to secure them. Great idea, but they have a recessed area that doesn't drain, so make sure you use the sealed plano boxes.
Flush mount rod holders: I don't know if it's just mine, or all of them, but I wish they were mounted closer to the outside and angle out more. With my current milk crate setup and camera mounted on the tracks, I can't use them.
Rear handle: Mounted inline with the long axis of the boat and off center, so when lifting from here the boat tips to the right.
Tag along wheel: Sticks out from the rear of the boat. I have stubbed my toes on it multiple times. It's a single wheel, so when lifting from the front handle, two hands are need to stabilize the boat to prevent tipping.
Storage: The wells are ok, but not big enough to store a large (20-28") fish. I picked up a medium native fish bag that I mounted above the front hatch that works well. Also no below deck storage.

Overall, I very happy with the boat for my use. For smooth, big, water, its works fine. Once the wind and waves pick up, it becomes a bear to paddle.
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Speed 
 
3.0
Stability 
 
5.0
Durability 
 
4.0
Features 
 
4.0
Value 
 
4.0
Justin Walstad Reviewed by Justin Walstad August 02, 2014
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (1)

Native Slayer 12 - Great all around kayak

I've had this kayak for a while now, so I think it's time for a review.
I fish this kayak on the saltwater flats and bays of Corpus Christi, so my critiques come from that perspective. So working from front to back, here is my critical analysis of the boat.

Pros:
Gear tracks: They are everywhere and make it very easy to mount the multitude of accessories that are now gear track compatible.
Handles: Front handle is perpendicular to the long axis of the boat and rigid. Gives a nice solid grip of the boat.
Bow well: Great for dry storage with the bow hatch cover. This makes it water proof. The well has scupper holes as well, so it will drain if you don't use the cover. 4 tie down point.
Console: Great place to mount a fish finder (more gear tracks here). Also gives easy access to the inside of the boat.
Cockpit: Very open design here. Plenty of room to stand. Not a lot to get tangled on. More gear tracks.
Seat: High and low position and very comfortable. No more wet but.
Mid handles: Also rigid like the others.
Behind seat dry bucket: Has a rubber hatch and a removable bucket that gives access inside the boat.
Flush mount rod holders: Come with the angler package.
Rear well: More gear tracks here with 4 tie down point. Fits standard milk crate with room to spare. Should fit the rectangle size as well, but haven't tried it.
Rear handle: Again a rigid one here, but this has more cons I will discuss below.
Rudder: Doesn't come with one, but rigged for it.
Tag along wheel: Makes portage easier and no need to carry a cart.

Cons:
Cockpit: Next to the seat are two slots for 3600 series plano boxes with a bungee to secure them. Great idea, but they have a recessed area that doesn't drain, so make sure you use the sealed plano boxes.
Flush mount rod holders: I don't know if it's just mine, or all of them, but I wish they were mounted closer to the outside and angle out more. With my current milk crate setup and camera mounted on the tracks, I can't use them.
Rear handle: Mounted inline with the long axis of the boat and off center, so when lifting from here the boat tips to the right.
Tag along wheel: Sticks out from the rear of the boat. I have stubbed my toes on it multiple times. It's a single wheel, so when lifting from the front handle, two hands are need to stabilize the boat to prevent tipping.
Storage: The wells are ok, but not big enough to store a large (20-28") fish. I picked up a medium native fish bag that I mounted above the front hatch that works well. Also no below deck storage.

Overall, I very happy with the boat for my use. For smooth, big, water, its works fine. Once the wind and waves pick up, it becomes a bear to paddle.

Pros & Cons

Pros:
Very stable, open deck, gear tracks everywhere
Cons:
Slow, heavy
Native Slayer 12 review
Was this review helpful to you? 
The 12 foot Native Slayer is one of the most talked about new kayaks the industry has seen. Being touted as “the perfect kayak”, “the next big thing” and “the best kayak on the market” it definitely piqued my curiosity. I wanted to see exactly what this boat could do.

After close to 70 hours on the water with the Slayer, I have become very familiar with the ins and outs of the boat. Lots of things are going on in this new endeavor for Native. Some are great, some need refinement.

The Good

At 12 feet long, 31 inches wide and 70 pounds, the Slayer is a boat that can be car topped, truck loaded or trailered. It offers stability in the water in both the high and low seat positions (which is about a 4 inch difference).

The front hatch cover is a major improvement over the initial offering. It can be used with scuppers in or out to offer itself as dry storage or a livewell of sorts to keep fish. Put the scuppers in and add ice to make it into a cooler. Through storms, huge swells and rain traveling down the highway, the front hatch cover held tight and kept the compartment dry. This was a huge surprise and a welcome one. The versatility of the front hatch is a great feature.

The scuppers throughout the boat are larger than your normal kayak scuppers. This helps drain water off the deck quickly when in wet situations. The Slayer paddles much drier than I thought it would. With a round nose without a ton of rocker, I expected more spray in rough conditions. What I found was quite the opposite. Water was pushed away and down the sides of the boat efficiently. I stayed dry and I like that, especially for winter river trips.

The deck is open for the most part with some pre-molded areas that are covered in a small dense foam. This quiets the deck and didn’t grab treble hooks near as readily as I feared. The front bungee clips seem out of place for my uses but I could see how a nice flybox could be secured by it.

The rear well is just a tad small on the Slayer 12. I could fit a BlackPak both directions but it was snug. There is not enough room to carry a 5 gallon bucket and a BlackPak. A little more width and 6 more inches of length in the rear well could have accomplished this.

The tag along wheel on the stern has been a point of argument since its introduction. I found myself using it more and more though I would only use it when the deck is clear and not loaded as the wheel is not wide enough to keep the kayak from tipping to one side or another if loaded.

Room for Improvement

The Slayer brags about lots of track to attach accessories to. While yes, there is lots of track on this boat, most of it is not accessible without a Phillips head screwdriver. The square hatch up front has inset track which is not usable without removal of both the hatch and the track. The track around the front hatch and rear tankwell are also bookended in by bungee clips that are screwed into place. This keeps you from being able to add or remove things on the fly without screwing and unscrewing hardware. This could be resolved with a different bungee attachment system. Creating a clip that would have a pinch to release function would fix almost all of the issues. The front square hatch just needs to be reworked. Tab screws or something would go a long way to improve this.

The biggest problem with the Slayer is no below deck storage. As a saltwater and river fisherman, I need to stow stuff below deck. I can’t do that at all in the Slayer. A rectangular access hatch in the front or back would fix this. So would closing in the front tank well. Give me something I can stow a rod or paddle below deck in and I’ll show you a kayak more people will buy.

The boat paddles well though it struggles more in wind which should be expected in a higher position with higher side walls. Where the seat is positioned heavier folks will be prone to getting water in the back well. Even with two scuppers back there, I was constantly pouring water out when I came back in. I weigh 175 and the boat has a 400 pound capacity. Be aware you may have to load balance on long trips to avoid the same thing.

The other glaring issue with the Slayer is the lack of paddle holders or rod holders. With the price point of this kayak you would think they could help you out with that. It seems they truly built this boat for a minimalist fly fisherman. For the record, paddle holders of some sort should come with a boat. Even if it’s just a bungee.


Final Thoughts

Overall the Slayer is a good boat for lots of applications. For the angler that day trips and doesn’t carry a lot of stuff, this will be a great boat. For Beyond The Breakers, I would pass. If you are looking for bay flats casting, the Slayer is also one to consider. Standing won’t be a problem for most people though it could take a few trips out to get your sea legs. It is easy to get in and out of and with the great Native seat, your back won’t mutiny after a day on the water. For around $1200, it is worth a good look.
Overall rating 
 
3.2
Speed 
 
3.0
Stability 
 
4.0
Durability 
 
4.0
Features 
 
2.0
Value 
 
3.0
Chris Payne Reviewed by Chris Payne January 16, 2014
Top 10 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (27)

Native Slayer 12

The 12 foot Native Slayer is one of the most talked about new kayaks the industry has seen. Being touted as “the perfect kayak”, “the next big thing” and “the best kayak on the market” it definitely piqued my curiosity. I wanted to see exactly what this boat could do.

After close to 70 hours on the water with the Slayer, I have become very familiar with the ins and outs of the boat. Lots of things are going on in this new endeavor for Native. Some are great, some need refinement.

The Good

At 12 feet long, 31 inches wide and 70 pounds, the Slayer is a boat that can be car topped, truck loaded or trailered. It offers stability in the water in both the high and low seat positions (which is about a 4 inch difference).

The front hatch cover is a major improvement over the initial offering. It can be used with scuppers in or out to offer itself as dry storage or a livewell of sorts to keep fish. Put the scuppers in and add ice to make it into a cooler. Through storms, huge swells and rain traveling down the highway, the front hatch cover held tight and kept the compartment dry. This was a huge surprise and a welcome one. The versatility of the front hatch is a great feature.

The scuppers throughout the boat are larger than your normal kayak scuppers. This helps drain water off the deck quickly when in wet situations. The Slayer paddles much drier than I thought it would. With a round nose without a ton of rocker, I expected more spray in rough conditions. What I found was quite the opposite. Water was pushed away and down the sides of the boat efficiently. I stayed dry and I like that, especially for winter river trips.

The deck is open for the most part with some pre-molded areas that are covered in a small dense foam. This quiets the deck and didn’t grab treble hooks near as readily as I feared. The front bungee clips seem out of place for my uses but I could see how a nice flybox could be secured by it.

The rear well is just a tad small on the Slayer 12. I could fit a BlackPak both directions but it was snug. There is not enough room to carry a 5 gallon bucket and a BlackPak. A little more width and 6 more inches of length in the rear well could have accomplished this.

The tag along wheel on the stern has been a point of argument since its introduction. I found myself using it more and more though I would only use it when the deck is clear and not loaded as the wheel is not wide enough to keep the kayak from tipping to one side or another if loaded.

Room for Improvement

The Slayer brags about lots of track to attach accessories to. While yes, there is lots of track on this boat, most of it is not accessible without a Phillips head screwdriver. The square hatch up front has inset track which is not usable without removal of both the hatch and the track. The track around the front hatch and rear tankwell are also bookended in by bungee clips that are screwed into place. This keeps you from being able to add or remove things on the fly without screwing and unscrewing hardware. This could be resolved with a different bungee attachment system. Creating a clip that would have a pinch to release function would fix almost all of the issues. The front square hatch just needs to be reworked. Tab screws or something would go a long way to improve this.

The biggest problem with the Slayer is no below deck storage. As a saltwater and river fisherman, I need to stow stuff below deck. I can’t do that at all in the Slayer. A rectangular access hatch in the front or back would fix this. So would closing in the front tank well. Give me something I can stow a rod or paddle below deck in and I’ll show you a kayak more people will buy.

The boat paddles well though it struggles more in wind which should be expected in a higher position with higher side walls. Where the seat is positioned heavier folks will be prone to getting water in the back well. Even with two scuppers back there, I was constantly pouring water out when I came back in. I weigh 175 and the boat has a 400 pound capacity. Be aware you may have to load balance on long trips to avoid the same thing.

The other glaring issue with the Slayer is the lack of paddle holders or rod holders. With the price point of this kayak you would think they could help you out with that. It seems they truly built this boat for a minimalist fly fisherman. For the record, paddle holders of some sort should come with a boat. Even if it’s just a bungee.


Final Thoughts

Overall the Slayer is a good boat for lots of applications. For the angler that day trips and doesn’t carry a lot of stuff, this will be a great boat. For Beyond The Breakers, I would pass. If you are looking for bay flats casting, the Slayer is also one to consider. Standing won’t be a problem for most people though it could take a few trips out to get your sea legs. It is easy to get in and out of and with the great Native seat, your back won’t mutiny after a day on the water. For around $1200, it is worth a good look.

Pros & Cons

Pros:
Stability, nice seat
Cons:
No under deck storage, needs features to be more usable
Was this review helpful to you? 


I picked up a sand Slayer 12 and took it that next day for a paddle on St. Andrews Bay, it was windy and I knew there wouldn’t be any fish but I wanted to see how this kayak handled rough conditions and with the bay being choppy I knew it would be interesting. I set out with the seat in the high position, I suddenly had great appreciation for the much improved visibility vs. sitting in the lower position that a majority of kayaks come in. After about an hour of paddling around and throwing out some lines I was enjoying this kayak. But the wind was more than I felt like dealing with so I headed in.

After taking the kayak out and giving it a good look over I will have to say my top three favorite parts of this kayak are that the deck and sitting area are clean very clean with lots of open space and flat decking made me wish I had a fly rod on this kayak. Second is the seat its comfortable in both the high and low position and stays put when needed and moves out of the way by flipping straight back when standing. Third (and this is coming from a wilderness systems owner) is that it has tracks for rigging both forward and rear tracks make it great for quickly moving adding or removing rod holders, camera mounts and basically any other track mounted accessory that could be mounted.

Once the weekend rolled around it was time to get to the creeks and the flats. This is where the Slayer shinned with it’s high seat and standing capability. I was able to use the built in tackle box holders on each side of the seat to hold all the tackle that I was going to be using for this adventure which made for even less clutter in the kayak. I went out and started fishing and all was going well my only complaint is that it is not a fast kayak but it is fast enough. If more speed is what you are looking for then I would try the Slayer 14.5 but this kayak proved to be a fishing machine and when the weather permit’s I would love to take it offshore for some big time fishing.

After spending two weeks testing this kayak and about five times on the water I can say this is a solid top of the line fishing kayak. My only cons for this kayak are the scupper holes are massive which is good when getting water out but bad when it starts to come in. Second, the wheel that comes with the kayak for making it easier to move is great if you are on a paved surface but falls short on any non-hard pact surface. My line also caught in it a few times but that is an easy fix since it is removable. The final con of this kayak is that it does not have a paddle holder on the side for holding things such as a paddle or a stake out pole. Most of the issues that I found with this kayak can all be fixed with a little bit of rigging and making it your own and once that is done this kayak is going to be one of the best fishing platforms on the market.
Overall rating 
 
4.2
Speed 
 
3.0
Stability 
 
4.0
Durability 
 
5.0
Features 
 
5.0
Value 
 
4.0
Doug Pomeroy Reviewed by Doug Pomeroy December 02, 2013
Top 10 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (16)

2 Weeks and a Native Slayer 12



I picked up a sand Slayer 12 and took it that next day for a paddle on St. Andrews Bay, it was windy and I knew there wouldn’t be any fish but I wanted to see how this kayak handled rough conditions and with the bay being choppy I knew it would be interesting. I set out with the seat in the high position, I suddenly had great appreciation for the much improved visibility vs. sitting in the lower position that a majority of kayaks come in. After about an hour of paddling around and throwing out some lines I was enjoying this kayak. But the wind was more than I felt like dealing with so I headed in.

After taking the kayak out and giving it a good look over I will have to say my top three favorite parts of this kayak are that the deck and sitting area are clean very clean with lots of open space and flat decking made me wish I had a fly rod on this kayak. Second is the seat its comfortable in both the high and low position and stays put when needed and moves out of the way by flipping straight back when standing. Third (and this is coming from a wilderness systems owner) is that it has tracks for rigging both forward and rear tracks make it great for quickly moving adding or removing rod holders, camera mounts and basically any other track mounted accessory that could be mounted.

Once the weekend rolled around it was time to get to the creeks and the flats. This is where the Slayer shinned with it’s high seat and standing capability. I was able to use the built in tackle box holders on each side of the seat to hold all the tackle that I was going to be using for this adventure which made for even less clutter in the kayak. I went out and started fishing and all was going well my only complaint is that it is not a fast kayak but it is fast enough. If more speed is what you are looking for then I would try the Slayer 14.5 but this kayak proved to be a fishing machine and when the weather permit’s I would love to take it offshore for some big time fishing.

After spending two weeks testing this kayak and about five times on the water I can say this is a solid top of the line fishing kayak. My only cons for this kayak are the scupper holes are massive which is good when getting water out but bad when it starts to come in. Second, the wheel that comes with the kayak for making it easier to move is great if you are on a paved surface but falls short on any non-hard pact surface. My line also caught in it a few times but that is an easy fix since it is removable. The final con of this kayak is that it does not have a paddle holder on the side for holding things such as a paddle or a stake out pole. Most of the issues that I found with this kayak can all be fixed with a little bit of rigging and making it your own and once that is done this kayak is going to be one of the best fishing platforms on the market.

Pros & Cons

Pros:
Clean deck, lots of gear tracks, very stable, awesome seat
Cons:
No internal storage,
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