Kayak Fishing Ultimate Resource

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Monday, 03 November 2014 23:24

Fishing Resume: A How-To

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To those wanting to pursue fishing pro staff positions, whether professional or promotional, the chances are pretty good you may be asked for a fishing resume at some point. When the time comes, it will pay dividends to know a few things.

 

What It Is

A fishing resume is different to almost every company. Some use it as a weeding out tool. The fact of the matter is, anytime I’ve asked someone for one, only about half the time will I ever see it. If you aren’t willing to put in the time to do a “one sheet” you won’t put in the time I’m expecting to promote my company.

Another thing it allows me to do is see if you can communicate. I’ll most likely talk to you on the phone, email back and forth and see what a polished product looks like from you before the resume process is concluded. If you don’t use spell check or construct sentences well, that might point to issues in helping sales. At a minimum, our conversation needs to go well.

 

How To Do It

Anglers often confuse a fishing resume with a job application. While listing accomplishments is important, I want to know how you are going to leverage your networks to help my product gain more market presence, sales, etc. If you have a YouTube channel, tell me about how you could make a video feature and include a link to an example. If you are a writer, link your blog and some other well known publications you’ve been published by. Spend more time talking about the future than the past. In talking about the future, under promise and over deliver, not the other way around. If you tell me how you can make an hour long video featuring my newest bait, shot underwater while fish attack it, and get one million views, you better deliver. Numbers and promises are typically something to avoid when forecasting. Setting goals is fine. Don’t promise.

Keep your resume as close to one page as possible. Nobody has time for a seven page resume, especially if six pages of it are all the companies that you pro staff for. While that’s great for you, it means your time is divided and my product may not get the attention I’d like. When listing other affiliations, list the big ones if there are several. Three or four is plenty and for some companies might be too many. Your time and endorsement/promotion has to be worth it.

 

Ok, Now What?

If you have your resume typed up, proofread and ready to go, have a few friends look it over. I don’t mean your beer buddies. Look to guys who do a lot of writing, guys who do quite a bit of promotional work in the fishing industry or even an English teacher. Allow them to ask questions. Take criticism and make changes as needed. Does it all fit on one sheet? If not, maybe edit it down a bit. It’s not a hard and fast rule but it will help.

You may never need a fishing resume but if you do, at least you’re a little more prepared. 

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Chris Payne

I've been fishing over 30 years and the majority of my time on the water has been spent in Texas with the occasional trips out of state. In 2003 I bought my first kayak and a new era in my fishing life was born. I learned the ropes quickly about gear, paddling, fishing, packing, safety and got a degree from the school of hard knocks with a major in kayak fishing. I learned a lot of ways to not do something.

I love kayak fishing and I want to share it with as many people as possible. That's the bottom line. 

www.kayakfishingblog.com

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